Second Cooking Lesson with Ayu

For our second cooking lesson we made Sweet Tempeh, Fried Noodles, and Black Rice Pudding for dessert. I thought I should mention that the sweet soy sauce we used is thick like maple syrup. I’ll have to look for it in my Asian market at home. The little packet on the left in the photo is oyster sauce, which technically violates the vegetarian thing, but I don’t care.

All the ingredients for the whole meal. The plate on the right (next to the coconut) contains black rice, 2 blocks of palm sugar, 2 bananas, and the fragrant panandan leaves. The iron tool next to the coconut is for opening the coconut.

Sweet Tempeh  (Serves 2)

 Ingredients:

2 blocks tempeh

Tempeh wrapped in a banana leaf. It’s about the same size as our blocks of tempeh at home.

6 garlic cloves

1 small shallot

1 red chili, seeds and veins removed

3 green onions

1 stalk celery, including some of the leaves

1 T. sweet soy sauce

1 T. ketchup

1 T. oyster sauce

coconut oil for frying

Preparation:

  1. Peel and mince the garlic, slice the shallots, and chop the red chilies. Put each ingredient on its own small plate.
  2. Cut the tempeh into small rectangular slabs about ¼ inch x ¼ inch x ¾ inch.
  3. Chop the green onions, including about 2 inches of the green part. Dice the celery and chop the leaves.
  4. Heat coconut oil (1/4 inch deep) in a large skillet over medium heat. When it is hot, carefully add the tempeh cubes and move them around in the pan to coat with the oil. Continue moving them around gently with spatula until they are golden on all sides. (You don’t need to turn them individually.)
  5. Remove the tempeh to a strainer or colander set over a bowl. Reserve 2 T. of the coconut oil.
  6. Using the same pan, heat the 2 T. of coconut oil. When it is hot, add the shallot and cook until golden brown. Add the garlic and the chili and stir fry for a minute or two until fragrant. Add the green onions, celery and the tempeh. Gently stir to mix.
  7. Add the sweet soy sauce, the ketchup, the oyster sauce, and a little salt and white pepper. Stir to coat all pieces with the sauce.
  8. Taste and correct flavors. Remove to a serving dish.

Sweet tempeh served on a banana leaf. This was one of our favorite dishes in Bali. I could have eaten this every day.

 

Fried Noodles (Balinese style)     Serves a lot more than 2

Ingredients:

1 pkg wavy Asian egg noodles

8 garlic cloves

1 large shallot

2 red chili, seeds and veins removed

4 green onions

2 stalk celery, including some of the leaves

1 bunch bok choy, washed and dried

2 eggs

1 medium carrot

½ small head of cabbage (2 cups chopped)

3 T. sweet soy sauce

3 T. ketchup

3 T. oyster sauce

2 T. coconut oil for frying

 

Preparation:

  1. Put on a pot of water to boil while you prepare the vegetables. When it boils, cook the noodles according to the directions on the package. Drain and add a little oil so the noodles don’t stick together. Set aside.
  2. Peel and mince the garlic, slice the shallots, and chop the red chilies. Put each ingredient on its own small plate.
  3. Dice the celery and green onions, including about 2 inches of the green part. Chop the bok choy and cabbage into bite size pieces. Dice the carrot. Dice the celery and chop the leaves.
  4. Heat coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. (You can use some of the coconut oil that you used to fry the tempeh.) When it is hot, add the shallot and cook until golden brown. Add the garlic and the chili and stir fry for a minute or two until fragrant.
  5. Add the green onions and celery and cook for 1 minute. Crack 2 eggs into the pan and stir them around until cooked and combined with the vegetables. Add the carrot, bok choy, and cabbage. Stir to mix well.
  6. Add the noodles.
  7. Add the sweet soy sauce, the ketchup, the oyster sauce, and a little salt and white pepper. Stir to coat all pieces with the sauce.
  8. Taste and correct flavors. Remove to a serving dish.

Fried noodles, ready to eat.

Black Rice Pudding

This dish takes some advance planning since the black rice needs to be soaked and cooked ahead of time. The whole dish can be made ahead of time and reheated for dessert or for breakfast.

 

Ingredients:

½ cup black rice

1 can coconut milk (or you can make your own coconut milk like we did. Instructions below.)

¾ cup palm sugar or ¾ cup dark brown sugar, packed

* 3 fragrant panandan leaves (These are used for flavoring and coloring cakes and other baked goods. Obviously you can only add these if you are in Bali.)

salt

sliced bananas

 

Preparation:

  1. Soak the black rice for 8 hours or more. Drain off the water.
  2. Put the soaked rice in a large pot and add 10 cups cold water (it should cover the rice by about 5 inches. Cook the rice over low heat for an hour or more. Taste to see if the rice is tender. You should have about ½ an inch of black water in the pan with the rice. If the rice isn’t tender yet, add more water and keep cooking it down until you have tender rice and about ½ inch of creamy, black, soupy water.

*Add the fragrant leaves to the last 15 minutes of cooking time.

3. While the rice is cooking, melt the brown sugar with 1 T. of water until syrupy. Set aside to use later.

4. Add 1 can coconut milk and a pinch of salt to the pot with the black rice. Bring to a boil, stirring so the rice doesn’t stick to the bottom. Boil for 5 minutes.

5. Add at least half of the sugar syrup. Taste and add more sugar as desired *Remove the leaves before serving.

6. Serve in small bowls or cups with sliced bananas on top.

 

Note: Here’s how to make your own coconut milk. This is the way we made it in Bali.

  1. Get a mature coconut off your tree in the back yard. Get your husband to remove the husk with a hatchet.

    Wayan removing the coconut husk.

  2. Crack the coconut open with a penyeluhan, a small crow-bar looking tool that is made just for opening coconuts.
  3. Drain off the coconut water.
  4. Separate the coconut meat from the hard shell. Break off 5 large chunks (about the size of your palm).
  5. Using a traditional wooden grater made from the bark of a palm fern tree, finely grate the coconut meat.

    Grating coconut

  6. Put the grated coconut in a large bowl and add 1½ cups of water. Using your hands, squeeze the water through the grated coconut for about 10 minutes. Remove as much grated coconut as you can with your hands, then drain the coconut milk off using a fine mesh strainer. It is now ready to add to the pot with the black rice (or whatever else you’re making.)
  7. Feed the discarded grated coconut to your pigs. (It makes the meat really tasty I’m told.) Use the coconut shell for making bowls and fancy spoons. Use the coconut husk for grilling suckling pig and other meats, or for your fire dance ceremony.

Highlight: Getting to know the neighborhood

October 13th

Today we began to get to know our host family better, and we took a walk through the town and the rice paddies near our house.

We are staying in a guest cottage at the home of Wayan Sueta and his family. His wife, Ayu, and his two boys, Agus and Anta, have welcomed us into the family. They keep telling us that they feel so honored that we have chosen to stay with them for a whole month and that this is to be our home. “There are no rules in Bali” so we should just feel at home and do as we like.

As it turns out, there are lots of rules in Bali, like we aren’t allowed to help with cleanup after meals. There is no restaurant in town, so Ayu cooks all our meals.

Ayu, chef extraordinaire.

She doesn’t want us to help out because they are charging us for meals – $4 per person. Coffee, tea, and bottled water are complimentary.  We had told them in advance that we are vegetarian, but we wanted to make sure we had the same definition of vegetarian (eggs and dairy ok, no fish). She asked us when we wanted to eat our meals and we said, “Oh, whenever your family is eating.” She said, “We have different times of hungry. It is not our culture to eat meals together. We cook all our food in the morning and then eat whenever we want during the day.” So, as it turns out, our meals are at different times of hungry, too.

We also said that we hoped it wouldn’t be too inconvenient for her to fix vegetarian meals for us when her family isn’t vegetarian. Then she laughed and said, “Oh no! Vegetarian is much more easy.” I believe she is the first person to ever say that to us. The food has been spectacular, by the way. They make their own coconut oil from the coconuts that grow all over the property and this is what she uses for cooking. It is so aromatic. In Bali, tofu, tempeh, and seitan are much more common and inexpensive than meat. They get fruit from their own property, along with many of the fabulous Balinese spices.

Breakfast is usually fruit and coffee or tea, sometimes with Balinese pancakes made from tapioca flour. Lunch and dinner usually consists of a noodle or rice dish, a vegetable dish, and a protein dish like tofu or tempeh, with fruit for dessert. I feel like we have landed in vegetarian heaven. My favorite dishes so far are sweet tempeh with chili, tofu crackers, and the stir fried noodles. I asked Ayu if I could hire her to teach me some of these dishes and she shyly and grateful accepted my proposition. I’m looking forward to my first class.

This is how the food comes to the table, under these colorful covers to keep the flies off. (It’s mango season so there are more flies than usual now, but not too bad.)

And under the covers we find… fried rice, cucumbers from the garden, and fried, salted “nuts” which are actually the little beans inside long beans. Yummy!

Both Wayan and Ayu have talked with us about religion and culture in Bali. I will let George go into more detail about Balinese Hinduism, but I will mention that every family compound has its own temple, and every community has temples to various gods that are used for specific rituals. Offerings are made several times throughout the day at the family temple. We are looking forward to our first community temple visit on Friday.

One of many offerings that appear each day. This one was just outside our bungalow.

 

On our walk through the town, we learned that not only are we the only guests at Wayan’s home, we are the only Westerners in the entire village. Everyone is very friendly and curious about us. The people who speak English stop and ask us where we are from and where we are staying. Those who only speak Balinese say hello and smile when we pass.

We are also a two minute walk from beautiful, terraced rice fields. Here are a few images from our first walk through the paddies. I’m sure there will be many more.

Wayan, our host and guide, chilling out in the rice fields and checking his voicemail.

This rice is almost ready to harvest, so an offering has been made to Dewi Sri, the goddess of the rice fields (and also of the market where the rice is sold.)

A shrine in the rice field. These are at the corner of every farmer’s plot, marking boundaries and protecting the field.

Looking good. His clothes are getting too big for him.

Beautiful terracing of the fields.

Sunset on the border between the rice field and the village.

Cooking class

One of the many cultural activities that students, teachers, and (lucky for me) significant others can participate in during the semester abroad in Florence is a couple of Italian cooking classes. George and I went to the first of two offered during the semester. I see it as an opportunity to learn some new recipes and cooking techniques and to work with real Italian cooks. George sees it as an opportunity to socialize and eat. Don’t get me wrong – George is very helpful and participatory.

Our menu for the evening was:

  • Baked caprese salad with eggplant
  • Potato gnocchi with meat sauce (or fresh tomato sauce for the vegetarians)
  • Salame dolce

We started our class by making dessert – salame dolce, or “sweet salame”. I had never heard of this dessert before and couldn’t imagine why salame was in the title. They had us begin by smashing up cookies that were very like graham crackers. George was a champion graham cracker smasher. A role model, really. The head chef had to stop him before he turned the bowl of graham crackers into dust.

 

Graham cracker smashing in progress. This was before George got a hold of it.

This is then combined with melted butter, egg yolks, sugar, and dark (really, really dark) chocolate cocoa powder. In order to replicate this recipe at home, I think we would have to use dutch-processed cocoa powder. You then roll it up into a a long, skinny, salame shaped roll covered in aluminum foil and put it in the refrigerator while you cook everything else.

Then it was on to the baked caprese salad. I’ve had caprese salad dozens of times, but never baked. They had grilled eggplant slices before we arrived. They had also blanched tomatoes and put an “x” on the bottom to make them easier to peel. We peeled the tomatoes and sliced them into rounds. We sliced the fresh mozzarella and then assembled the parts onto baking pans. First you put down three overlapping slices of eggplant in a triangle, topped by 3 slices of peeled tomato, and then topped by 2 slices of mozzarella. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with dried oregano, salt, and pepper. Bake in oven until cheese is melty. Transfer to dishes and sprinkle with fresh parsley or basil. Oh yeah, and plenty of olive oil.

Ariana showing off our caprese antipasto. It was SO good!

And then there was the main dish – potato gnocchi from scratch. They had cooked the potatoes ahead of time. They said that you should only use red or white potatoes. Yellow potatoes are too sticky. You peel the potatoes and press them through a ricer or food mill. This is a very clever little contraption that reminded me of a big garlic press. It keeps the potatoes from getting too smashed and sticky. Then you add flour and an egg yolk to the potatoes. You gently combine, and then turn your dough out onto a floured surface and work in more flour until you have a nice consistency. (This is where things get vague. You just do what they say until they tell you it is right.)

Then you pinch off handfuls of dough and roll it out into fat pencil shapes. You cut these with a knife into little pillows of potato pasta. Making sure you have enough flour that they don’t stick to each other, you put these on a pan until you’re ready to cook them. Meanwhile you peel some tomatoes, and cook it in olive oil and garlic for about 10 minutes. You boil the gnocchi until they float, remove them from the water and stir them around in the tomato sauce. Result? Light, floaty, delicious gnocchi.

Here we are about to sit down to our home-cooked meal.

Ready to enjoy the fruits of our labors.

And now, the moment you’ve all been waiting for… Here’s why they call it Salame dolce…

This is all kinds of chocolatey goodness. It really looks like salame, doesn't it?

This dessert was absolutely amazing. I’ve never had anything like it. The chocolate flavor was intense. I made this the following week and it turned out really great.

I have recipes for everything we made. I’ll post them separately when I get a minute.